Mr Lim

Why do you need a Personal Domain Name?

Personal Domain Names

A personal domain name is your chance to own a tiny slice of the Internet. For a nominal annual fee, you can register a .com, .sg or similar for use with a website and email address. With the prevalence of the Internet and the low entry barriers to registering a domain name, I believe it is important for everyone to have their very own personal domain name.

Once your personal domain name is taken by another individual with the same name, it’s often near-impossible to reclaim it (unless of course you’re willing to pay a hefty sum). This means that you should really act fast and grab your domain today!

You might be thinking: Why should you care? What would you even use it for?

Trust me on this. You might not need it today but in a few years time you’ll want it. It’s definitely worthwhile future proofing yourself now, while you still can, rather than taking a gamble and ending up with an awful alternative because it’s the only one left. It doesn’t even need to have a website, you can forward it to your Facebook, Twitter, or LinkedIn.

It’s also super easy to setup the best possible email address: . Rather than the scrappy @gmail.com or the ridiculous @hotmail.com you created when you were twelve.

It will also be invaluable for personal branding. You gain control of what people see when they search for you. While how Google’s search results work exactly is secret, there’s a good chance that when someone enters your “FirstName LastName”, odds are your website will be among the first few results.

What happens if you piss off a tech savvy individual? If you don’t have control over your personal domain name, you might find it being used against you.

Right now you can get a domain name for SGD 20 a year. Price of a drink or two nets you endless benefits, a unique email address and control over your online reputation, how is that not worth it? You won’t regret it. Hell, if you decide after a year that you don’t need it, just let the registration expire.

Originally written on 19 March 2015.